General

Fireplace

Submarine

Chocolate

Beer

Ink in water

Nuke

 

General

The following samples are provided to illustrate the usage of the different features in Phoenix FD. They can be found in the following folder: My Documents\Phoenix FD\samples

Fireplace

 


This scene demonstrates how to setup fire and how to use it to light an interior. The simulation uses higher SPF than the default one, because the fire has quick dynamics. No fuel is used, just hot air released from the logs. This requires special fire luminance ramp, which suppresses the emission near the logs, otherwise the fire will be brighter at the logs surface. The specific part of the rendering is the setup of the lighting. First, the fire lighting is enabled and 50 lights are used. In V-Ray all the lights are assembled in one, and thus the rendering speed does not depend on the light count, however the pre-pass phase is still slower when the lights count is bigger. To illuminate the room, brute force + photon map is used. By default the GI subdivisions of Phoenix FD are 100, in this scene, however they are increased, because of the animation.

 

 

Full video

Submarine

 


An example of sea simulation involving foam and splash. Only the zone where the submarine appears is simulated, the rest of the ocean is just surface with waves. The foam is born indirectly, by the splash, for large scale scenes this method is better than direct foam birth, because it can't produce bunches of foam. The rendering of the ocean surface uses the "ocean" feature of the mesher, and displacement with ocean texture.

 

 

Full video

 

Chocolate

 

This example shows how to simulate the covering process of a cookie with chocolate, that is a very common situation in the commercials. The parameter that makes the liquid thick is the viscosity, the bigger is the viscosity, the thicker is the liquid. For smoother rendering the surface level is below the normal value, by default it is 0.5, but in this scene is set to 0.1

By default the scene uses VRay, however if you are using the scanline version of Phoenix FD, just enable the option "render as mesh" and the scene will become renderable in any render engine. For smoother surface the filtering is enabled, that will lead to slow time slider response, disable it if you need fast response, but don't forget to re-enable it before rendering.

 

 

Full video

Beer

 

This example shows how to simulate pouring beer. The foam is born directly (not using splash), first the size of the bubbles is adjusted by starting test simulations with low birth rate. When the bubbles have a good size, the birth rate is increased until a good head size is achieved. The SPF is high because the initial filling contains quick moving parts. To produce the damp effect of the foam, the viscosity is animated from 0 to 0.1 in the part where the foam rises to the surface.

 

 

Full video

Ink in water

 

This example demonstrates a technique for rendering of thin smoke layers, ink in water, etc. The technique is particle based and uses the point mode of the foam shader. To achieve god smoothness of the result, more than 50M particles are used, that produces extremely huge cache files size, up to 1GB per frame. To avoid the loading of the file in the memory that can take more time than the simulation itself, preview is switched off. Re-enable it if you want to observe the simulation process.

 

 

Full video

Nuke

 

An example of a nuclear mushroom cloud. The ground underneath is made up of cool thick smoke that is sucked into the rising fireball and forms the mushroom stem. The blast wave is made by an expanding horizontal ring of particles that are shot simulataneously with the fireball. The fireball itself is created for just a single frame by a brush source - all grid cells inside a spherical mesh are set to a very high temperature, so that it starts rising upwards. It is essential that the scene's unit scale is a big number, so the diameter of the fireball is several hundred meters - this makes it rise slowly and also affects the cooling rate. The conservation quality is set to a very high value to help forming the stem and to keep the mushroom cloud more symmetric. This example also uses adaptive grid size - the grid starts up small and gradually expands when its content reaches its borders - this saves a lot of simulation time in large grids with rising smoke and explosions.

 

 

Full video