Example 1: Displacement vs Bump mapping

Example 2: Clip mapping

Example 3: A Landscape

Example 4: Displacement on a character

Example 5: The Keep continuity option

Example 6: Subdivision displacement

Example 7: Split Method

Example 8: Vector displacement

Example 9: Texture boundaries

 

Example 1: Displacement vs Bump mapping

This example shows the difference between bump mapping and displacement mapping. Notice the round outline of the sphere and its shadow in the case of bump mapping, and the deformed outline produced by the displacement:

 

Bump mapping
Displacement mapping

 

The displacement map in this case is a 3d Cellular map; the 3D displacement method was used.

 

Example 2: Clip mapping

This example demonstrates the use of displacement mapping to clip away geometry from an object. The displacement map is a mix of a Noise map and a tiled Gradient ramp map; the dark regions of the map are clipped away:

 

 

In this case the displacement map was applied to an explicit mapping channel; 2D displacement was used in this case.

 

Example 3: A Landscape

This is an example of a displaced landscape; 2D displacement was used; the displacement map is a Simbiont procedural texture.

 

 

Example 4: Displacement on a character

This example shows displacement on a character; the map is a 3D cellular map, so the 3D displacement method is used.

 

Note that if the character is animated and the map is a 3d map using Object XYZ mapping, then the map will change relative to the object surface, since the surface itself changes its position in space. If you want to lock 3d procedural maps to the surfaces of animated objects, apply a UVW Map modifier with mode set to XYZ to UVW to the objects, and use Explicit mapping channel for the procedural map.

 

Character without displacement
Character with displacement

 

Example 5: The Keep continuity option

The Keep continuity option is useful for objects with disjoint normals on neighboring triangles, usually because of different smoothing groups. In the middle image below you can see the edge splits produced by disjoint normals. Using the Keep continuity option avoids this problem. This option will also help to produce a smoother result across material ID boundaries for objects with multi/subobject materials.

 

No displacement
Keep continuity is off
Keep continuity is on

 

Example 6: Subdivision displacement

Here is an example of subdivision displacement (head model by Alexander Sokerov):

 

No subdivision/displacement
Only subdivision (displacement Amount is 0.0)
Subdivision and displacement

 

Example 7: Split Method

This example shows the effect of the Split method parameter. To better illustrate the effect, the object has a Standard material with the Faceted option on, and a VRayEdgesTex texture in the diffuse slot to show the boundaries of the original mesh triangles. Note how the Binary setting may cause the orientation of the displacement sub-triangles to change, whereas the Quad setting keeps them aligned in the same way.

Binary Split Method
Quad Split Method
Split method is set to Binary
Split method is set to Quad

 

Example 8: Vector displacement

This example shows the effect of the Vector displacement option in more detail.

 

The first image on the left shows a complex detail that we convert to a vector displacement map by baking a simpler version of the object with a VRayVectorDisplBake material on it. The second image shows the resulting displacement map, where the red, green and blue components define displacement vectors in the texture UVW space. The final image on the right shows the vector displacement map applied on another object through the VRayDisplacementMod modifier.

 

A piece of complex geometry, and a simple version with a VRayVectorDisplBake material The displacement map, computed by texture baking with the VRayCompleteMap bake element of the simple geometry. The result is saved into an .exr file (a .png file is shown here for the help index). The displacement map applied on a different geometry through the VRayDisplacementMod modifier with Vector displacement option on.

Example 9: Texture boundaries

This example shows a plane mapped with a displacement map that has negative values. With the default bounderies for the displacement we are unable to see the geometry displaced in the negative direction. However once we set the custom boundaries to -1 and 1 we can see the displaced geometry in both the positive and negative direction.

 

Texmap min = 0 ; Texmap max = 1
Texmap min = -1; Texmap max = 1