General

V-Ray RT options

General Options

Performance

Notes

 

General

V-Ray RT is an interactive rendering engine for Rhino. To start using V-Ray RT you can simply left mouse click the RT button from the main V-Ray toolbar. You can always switch back to the V-Ray production renderer by clicking the RT button with the right mouse button.

[Main Toolbar]




 

To start V-Ray RT manually you must first start a local DRSpawner. Next, you must enable from the RTEngine rollout in the V-Ray renderer parameters. Finally you must enable Distributed Rendering from the System rollout of the V-Ray renderer parameters.

V-Ray RT options

General Options

Enable  - turn on or off the V-Ray RT engine.

 

Refraction Caustics  - this allows indirect lighting to pass through transparent objects (glass etc). Note that this is not the same as Caustics, which represent direct light going through transparent objects. You need refractive GI caustics to get skylight through windows, for example.

 

Reflective Caustics  - this allows indirect light to be reflected from specular objects (mirrors etc).

Note that this is not the same as Caustics, which represent direct light going through specular surfaces. This is off by default, because reflective GI caustics usually contribute little to the final illumination, while often they produce undesired subtle noise.

 

Trace depth  - Represents the maximum number of bounces that will be computed for reflections and refractions. The individual material reflection/refraction depth settings are still considered, so long as they don't exceed the value specified here.[RTEngine rollout]

 

GI depth - the number of bounces for indirect illumination. Other GI settings (e.g. whether GI is enabled or disabled) are taken from the production V-Ray renderer.

 

Performance

The parameters in this section affect the performance of V-Ray RT. Note that the optimal values for a given machine and network configurations may be different from the defaults. The user is encouraged to experiment with these values to find the optimal ones.

 

Ray bundle size  - This controls the number of rays that are sent to the V-Ray RT render servers for processing. When using distributed rendering, the smaller sizes cause more frequent client/server communication with smaller network packets thus decreasing the speed of the renderer but increasing the interactivity and vice versa. Note that this number is not the exact amount of rays, but is proportional to it. It is not recommended to increase this value beyond 512.

 

Rays per pixel  - The number of rays that are traced for each pixel during one image pass. The greater the value, the smoother the picture from the very beginning of the rendering with GI, but interactivity may be significantly diminished. Increasing this value also reduces amount of data transferred from the render servers back to client machine.

Notes